Newton's Second Law o
f Motion

Acceleration is produced when a force acts on a mass. The greater the mass (of the object being accelerated) the greater the amount of force needed (to accelerate the object).


For example, if you are pushing on an object, causing it to accelerate, and then you push, say, three times harder, the acceleration will be three times greater.


Everyone unconsiously knows the Second Law. Everyone knows that heavier objects require more force to move the same distance as lighter objects.

Watch the video located on the right.

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However, the Second Law gives us an exact relationship between force, mass, and acceleration. It can be expressed as a mathematical equation: F=MA or FORCE = MASS times ACCELERATION








HOW THIS WORKS: car.jpg

Mike's car, which weighs 1,000 kg, is out of gas. Mike is trying to push the car to a gas station, and he makes the car go 0.05 m/s/s. Using Newton's Second Law, you can compute how much force Mike is applying to the car.

F=1,000 X 0.05

Answer = 50 newtons


NEWTON'S SECOND LAW OF MOTION - ACTIVITY TWO:
Student will be able to (SWBAT):
1. State Newton's 2nd Law of Motion
2. Explan how mass and force affect acceleration


Newton's Second Law of Motion Activity:
Newton 2nd law activity.docx
Once you complete Newton's Second Law Motion Activity, prepare yourself to post your response to the homework discussion: Think of an everyday event that applies to Newton's Second Law of Motion.
Newton's Second Law Team Points:
1. Using the homework assignment, discuss your responses with your teammates and select, what you collaboratively feel, is the best example to display on your team page to represent Newton's Second Law.
Keep in mind, only one can edit a page at a time.
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